The Daily Meal

Apr 17

10 Outrageously Expensive Dishes Around the World  Most people don’t mind paying a little extra for a really good steak, especially if it’s made from delicious Kobe beef. Sometimes you may even be willing to fork out a little extra cash for a gourmet lobster dinner… but would you still do it if that lobster came with flakes of edible gold leaf and set you back more than a thousand dollars?
Click here to see 10 Outrageously Expensive Desserts Around the World (Slideshow)
Around the world, chefs are challenging themselves to create some decadently expensive meals. From an absurdly expensive bagel at the Westin Hotel in New York City (made with white truffle and gold leaves), to an omelette made with a whole lobster that’ll cost around $1000 (also in New York City, incidentally), to an English soup made with shark’s fin which all costs just under $200 — people are whipping up dishes with rare and expensive ingredients and charging an arm and a leg for them.
What’s perhaps even more outrageous is that their fancy clientele is more than willing to pay for it. Some of these dishes need to be ordered in advance and have a weeks-long waiting list for them. Others are not big sellers: like Arnaud’s Strawberries in New Orleans, which comes with a diamond ring and is generally reserved for really over-the-top proposals (though at a price point of over $3 million, selling just one of these dishes every few months should be more than enough to cover your rent bill).
Think that’s excessive? Read on to learn more about some of the world’s most outrageously expensive dishes.
Chocolate Pudding — Lindeth Howe Country House Hotel, England

Who doesn’t love a good chocolate pudding? from the guests at the Lindeth Howe Country Hotel better if they plan on ordering one. This one is made with the best quality chocolate on the planet which is molded into the shape of Fabergé egg and served with layer upon layer of champagne jelly. It’s then topped with edible gold leaf and served with champagne and caviar. The whole thing is then topped off with a diamond. Don’t think you can order this à la carte though… you’ll need to pre-order this dessert at least two weeks in advance.
Price: $35,000
Westin Hotel Bagel —New York City

What’s your favorite bagel topping? Cream cheese? Lox? Perhaps if you feel like splurging a bit, you’ll opt for some smoked salmon or even caviar? One New York chef decided to push the bagel envelope by adding white truffle cream cheese, goji berry-infused Riesling jelly, and topped with gold leaves making it the world’s most expensive bagel (mostly because white truffles are the second most expensive food on the planet). It was designed to help raise funds for Les Amis d’Escoffier Scholarship, which raises funds for needy students of the culinary arts.
Price: $1000
Read on for more about the most Outrageously Expensive Desserts Around the World  http://ift.tt/1j9K1Ww10 Outrageously Expensive Dishes Around the World

Most people don’t mind paying a little extra for a really good steak, especially if it’s made from delicious Kobe beef. Sometimes you may even be willing to fork out a little extra cash for a gourmet lobster dinner… but would you still do it if that lobster came with flakes of edible gold leaf and set you back more than a thousand dollars?

Click here to see 10 Outrageously Expensive Desserts Around the World (Slideshow)

Around the world, chefs are challenging themselves to create some decadently expensive meals. From an absurdly expensive bagel at the Westin Hotel in New York City (made with white truffle and gold leaves), to an omelette made with a whole lobster that’ll cost around $1000 (also in New York City, incidentally), to an English soup made with shark’s fin which all costs just under $200 — people are whipping up dishes with rare and expensive ingredients and charging an arm and a leg for them.

What’s perhaps even more outrageous is that their fancy clientele is more than willing to pay for it. Some of these dishes need to be ordered in advance and have a weeks-long waiting list for them. Others are not big sellers: like Arnaud’s Strawberries in New Orleans, which comes with a diamond ring and is generally reserved for really over-the-top proposals (though at a price point of over $3 million, selling just one of these dishes every few months should be more than enough to cover your rent bill).

Think that’s excessive? Read on to learn more about some of the world’s most outrageously expensive dishes.

Chocolate Pudding — Lindeth Howe Country House Hotel, England

Who doesn’t love a good chocolate pudding? from the guests at the Lindeth Howe Country Hotel better if they plan on ordering one. This one is made with the best quality chocolate on the planet which is molded into the shape of Fabergé egg and served with layer upon layer of champagne jelly. It’s then topped with edible gold leaf and served with champagne and caviar. The whole thing is then topped off with a diamond. Don’t think you can order this à la carte though… you’ll need to pre-order this dessert at least two weeks in advance.

Price: $35,000

Westin Hotel Bagel —New York City

What’s your favorite bagel topping? Cream cheese? Lox? Perhaps if you feel like splurging a bit, you’ll opt for some smoked salmon or even caviar? One New York chef decided to push the bagel envelope by adding white truffle cream cheese, goji berry-infused Riesling jelly, and topped with gold leaves making it the world’s most expensive bagel (mostly because white truffles are the second most expensive food on the planet). It was designed to help raise funds for Les Amis d’Escoffier Scholarship, which raises funds for needy students of the culinary arts.

Price: $1000

Read on for more about the most Outrageously Expensive Desserts Around the World

http://ift.tt/1j9K1Ww

10 Outrageously Expensive Dishes Around the World  Most people don’t mind paying a little extra for a really good steak, especially if it’s made from delicious Kobe beef. Sometimes you may even be willing to fork out a little extra cash for a gourmet lobster dinner… but would you still do it if that lobster came with flakes of edible gold leaf and set you back more than a thousand dollars?
Click here to see 10 Outrageously Expensive Desserts Around the World (Slideshow)
Around the world, chefs are challenging themselves to create some decadently expensive meals. From an absurdly expensive bagel at the Westin Hotel in New York City (made with white truffle and gold leaves), to an omelette made with a whole lobster that’ll cost around $1000 (also in New York City, incidentally), to an English soup made with shark’s fin which all costs just under $200 — people are whipping up dishes with rare and expensive ingredients and charging an arm and a leg for them.
What’s perhaps even more outrageous is that their fancy clientele is more than willing to pay for it. Some of these dishes need to be ordered in advance and have a weeks-long waiting list for them. Others are not big sellers: like Arnaud’s Strawberries in New Orleans, which comes with a diamond ring and is generally reserved for really over-the-top proposals (though at a price point of over $3 million, selling just one of these dishes every few months should be more than enough to cover your rent bill).
Think that’s excessive? Read on to learn more about some of the world’s most outrageously expensive dishes.
Chocolate Pudding — Lindeth Howe Country House Hotel, England

Who doesn’t love a good chocolate pudding? from the guests at the Lindeth Howe Country Hotel better if they plan on ordering one. This one is made with the best quality chocolate on the planet which is molded into the shape of Fabergé egg and served with layer upon layer of champagne jelly. It’s then topped with edible gold leaf and served with champagne and caviar. The whole thing is then topped off with a diamond. Don’t think you can order this à la carte though… you’ll need to pre-order this dessert at least two weeks in advance.
Price: $35,000
Westin Hotel Bagel —New York City

What’s your favorite bagel topping? Cream cheese? Lox? Perhaps if you feel like splurging a bit, you’ll opt for some smoked salmon or even caviar? One New York chef decided to push the bagel envelope by adding white truffle cream cheese, goji berry-infused Riesling jelly, and topped with gold leaves making it the world’s most expensive bagel (mostly because white truffles are the second most expensive food on the planet). It was designed to help raise funds for Les Amis d’Escoffier Scholarship, which raises funds for needy students of the culinary arts.
Price: $1000
Read on for more about the most Outrageously Expensive Desserts Around the World  http://ift.tt/1j9K1Ww10 Outrageously Expensive Dishes Around the World

Most people don’t mind paying a little extra for a really good steak, especially if it’s made from delicious Kobe beef. Sometimes you may even be willing to fork out a little extra cash for a gourmet lobster dinner… but would you still do it if that lobster came with flakes of edible gold leaf and set you back more than a thousand dollars?

Click here to see 10 Outrageously Expensive Desserts Around the World (Slideshow)

Around the world, chefs are challenging themselves to create some decadently expensive meals. From an absurdly expensive bagel at the Westin Hotel in New York City (made with white truffle and gold leaves), to an omelette made with a whole lobster that’ll cost around $1000 (also in New York City, incidentally), to an English soup made with shark’s fin which all costs just under $200 — people are whipping up dishes with rare and expensive ingredients and charging an arm and a leg for them.

What’s perhaps even more outrageous is that their fancy clientele is more than willing to pay for it. Some of these dishes need to be ordered in advance and have a weeks-long waiting list for them. Others are not big sellers: like Arnaud’s Strawberries in New Orleans, which comes with a diamond ring and is generally reserved for really over-the-top proposals (though at a price point of over $3 million, selling just one of these dishes every few months should be more than enough to cover your rent bill).

Think that’s excessive? Read on to learn more about some of the world’s most outrageously expensive dishes.

Chocolate Pudding — Lindeth Howe Country House Hotel, England

Who doesn’t love a good chocolate pudding? from the guests at the Lindeth Howe Country Hotel better if they plan on ordering one. This one is made with the best quality chocolate on the planet which is molded into the shape of Fabergé egg and served with layer upon layer of champagne jelly. It’s then topped with edible gold leaf and served with champagne and caviar. The whole thing is then topped off with a diamond. Don’t think you can order this à la carte though… you’ll need to pre-order this dessert at least two weeks in advance.

Price: $35,000

Westin Hotel Bagel —New York City

What’s your favorite bagel topping? Cream cheese? Lox? Perhaps if you feel like splurging a bit, you’ll opt for some smoked salmon or even caviar? One New York chef decided to push the bagel envelope by adding white truffle cream cheese, goji berry-infused Riesling jelly, and topped with gold leaves making it the world’s most expensive bagel (mostly because white truffles are the second most expensive food on the planet). It was designed to help raise funds for Les Amis d’Escoffier Scholarship, which raises funds for needy students of the culinary arts.

Price: $1000

Read on for more about the most Outrageously Expensive Desserts Around the World

http://ift.tt/1j9K1Ww

11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting  Ever wonder how Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor “Chunky Monkey” is made to be the ideal blend of chunky and creamy? Or what flavorings are added to Jelly Belly jelly beans to make them taste like “Buttered Popcorn?”
11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting (Slideshow)
The secrets to creating these and other iconic foods are revealed in factory tours around the world, where you can watch your favorite treat made first-hand and can sometimes make it yourself. You may even get to taste a sample or two.
At the Chocolaterie Duval factory in Belgium, visitors get a hands-on tutorial in making the chocolate company’s famous caraques and pralines, from tempering and molding it to designing, packaging, and eventually eating it.
In Japan, recreating the invention of the world’s first instant ramen, the Instant Ramen museum educates guests on how the classic Asian noodle is made and lets them make their own.
Nowhere else can you find as many classic, unusual, and novelty jelly bean flavors than at the Jelly Belly factory in Fairfield, Calif., where the factory air smells like whatever jelly bean flavors are being made that day… maybe cinnamon, buttered popcorn, or strawberry jam.
Read on for more world famous food factories that are worth the trip across the world.

Ben & Jerry’s — U.S.A

Ice cream connoisseurs curious about how their favorite ice cream flavors like “Chunky Monkey” or “Cherry Garcia” are made can watch the flavor magic happen in a guided tour at the Ben & Jerry’s factory in Vermont. Visitors are given an ice cream sample of the day and can try more flavors at the factory’s scoop shop. The Flavor Graveyard is just up the hill from the factory and is available for paying respects to retired Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavors.
Cadbury — United Kingdom

Chocolate “comes to life” at Cadbury World, where chocolate lovers can hop into a “Beanmobile” and explore the history of chocolate, how it’s made, wrapped, and packaged at the Cadbury factory, and more. The park is home to the “World’s Biggest Cadbury Shop,” where guests will find all of their favorite Cadbury chocolates as well as novelty treats not sold at any other chocolate shop.
Click here for more World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting
Haley WIllard is The Daily Meal’s assistant editor. Follow her on Twitter @haleywillrd.  http://ift.tt/1j9GUiB11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting

Ever wonder how Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor “Chunky Monkey” is made to be the ideal blend of chunky and creamy? Or what flavorings are added to Jelly Belly jelly beans to make them taste like “Buttered Popcorn?”

11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting (Slideshow)

The secrets to creating these and other iconic foods are revealed in factory tours around the world, where you can watch your favorite treat made first-hand and can sometimes make it yourself. You may even get to taste a sample or two.

At the Chocolaterie Duval factory in Belgium, visitors get a hands-on tutorial in making the chocolate company’s famous caraques and pralines, from tempering and molding it to designing, packaging, and eventually eating it.

In Japan, recreating the invention of the world’s first instant ramen, the Instant Ramen museum educates guests on how the classic Asian noodle is made and lets them make their own.

Nowhere else can you find as many classic, unusual, and novelty jelly bean flavors than at the Jelly Belly factory in Fairfield, Calif., where the factory air smells like whatever jelly bean flavors are being made that day… maybe cinnamon, buttered popcorn, or strawberry jam.

Read on for more world famous food factories that are worth the trip across the world.

Ben & Jerry’s — U.S.A

Ice cream connoisseurs curious about how their favorite ice cream flavors like “Chunky Monkey” or “Cherry Garcia” are made can watch the flavor magic happen in a guided tour at the Ben & Jerry’s factory in Vermont. Visitors are given an ice cream sample of the day and can try more flavors at the factory’s scoop shop. The Flavor Graveyard is just up the hill from the factory and is available for paying respects to retired Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavors.

Cadbury — United Kingdom

Chocolate “comes to life” at Cadbury World, where chocolate lovers can hop into a “Beanmobile” and explore the history of chocolate, how it’s made, wrapped, and packaged at the Cadbury factory, and more. The park is home to the “World’s Biggest Cadbury Shop,” where guests will find all of their favorite Cadbury chocolates as well as novelty treats not sold at any other chocolate shop.

Click here for more World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting

Haley WIllard is The Daily Meal’s assistant editor. Follow her on Twitter @haleywillrd.

http://ift.tt/1j9GUiB

11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting  Ever wonder how Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor “Chunky Monkey” is made to be the ideal blend of chunky and creamy? Or what flavorings are added to Jelly Belly jelly beans to make them taste like “Buttered Popcorn?”
11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting (Slideshow)
The secrets to creating these and other iconic foods are revealed in factory tours around the world, where you can watch your favorite treat made first-hand and can sometimes make it yourself. You may even get to taste a sample or two.
At the Chocolaterie Duval factory in Belgium, visitors get a hands-on tutorial in making the chocolate company’s famous caraques and pralines, from tempering and molding it to designing, packaging, and eventually eating it.
In Japan, recreating the invention of the world’s first instant ramen, the Instant Ramen museum educates guests on how the classic Asian noodle is made and lets them make their own.
Nowhere else can you find as many classic, unusual, and novelty jelly bean flavors than at the Jelly Belly factory in Fairfield, Calif., where the factory air smells like whatever jelly bean flavors are being made that day… maybe cinnamon, buttered popcorn, or strawberry jam.
Read on for more world famous food factories that are worth the trip across the world.

Ben & Jerry’s — U.S.A

Ice cream connoisseurs curious about how their favorite ice cream flavors like “Chunky Monkey” or “Cherry Garcia” are made can watch the flavor magic happen in a guided tour at the Ben & Jerry’s factory in Vermont. Visitors are given an ice cream sample of the day and can try more flavors at the factory’s scoop shop. The Flavor Graveyard is just up the hill from the factory and is available for paying respects to retired Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavors.
Cadbury — United Kingdom

Chocolate “comes to life” at Cadbury World, where chocolate lovers can hop into a “Beanmobile” and explore the history of chocolate, how it’s made, wrapped, and packaged at the Cadbury factory, and more. The park is home to the “World’s Biggest Cadbury Shop,” where guests will find all of their favorite Cadbury chocolates as well as novelty treats not sold at any other chocolate shop.
Click here for more World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting
Haley WIllard is The Daily Meal’s assistant editor. Follow her on Twitter @haleywillrd.  http://ift.tt/1j9GUiB11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting

Ever wonder how Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor “Chunky Monkey” is made to be the ideal blend of chunky and creamy? Or what flavorings are added to Jelly Belly jelly beans to make them taste like “Buttered Popcorn?”

11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting (Slideshow)

The secrets to creating these and other iconic foods are revealed in factory tours around the world, where you can watch your favorite treat made first-hand and can sometimes make it yourself. You may even get to taste a sample or two.

At the Chocolaterie Duval factory in Belgium, visitors get a hands-on tutorial in making the chocolate company’s famous caraques and pralines, from tempering and molding it to designing, packaging, and eventually eating it.

In Japan, recreating the invention of the world’s first instant ramen, the Instant Ramen museum educates guests on how the classic Asian noodle is made and lets them make their own.

Nowhere else can you find as many classic, unusual, and novelty jelly bean flavors than at the Jelly Belly factory in Fairfield, Calif., where the factory air smells like whatever jelly bean flavors are being made that day… maybe cinnamon, buttered popcorn, or strawberry jam.

Read on for more world famous food factories that are worth the trip across the world.

Ben & Jerry’s — U.S.A

Ice cream connoisseurs curious about how their favorite ice cream flavors like “Chunky Monkey” or “Cherry Garcia” are made can watch the flavor magic happen in a guided tour at the Ben & Jerry’s factory in Vermont. Visitors are given an ice cream sample of the day and can try more flavors at the factory’s scoop shop. The Flavor Graveyard is just up the hill from the factory and is available for paying respects to retired Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavors.

Cadbury — United Kingdom

Chocolate “comes to life” at Cadbury World, where chocolate lovers can hop into a “Beanmobile” and explore the history of chocolate, how it’s made, wrapped, and packaged at the Cadbury factory, and more. The park is home to the “World’s Biggest Cadbury Shop,” where guests will find all of their favorite Cadbury chocolates as well as novelty treats not sold at any other chocolate shop.

Click here for more World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting

Haley WIllard is The Daily Meal’s assistant editor. Follow her on Twitter @haleywillrd.

http://ift.tt/1j9GUiB

11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting  Ever wonder how Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor “Chunky Monkey” is made to be the ideal blend of chunky and creamy? Or what flavorings are added to Jelly Belly jelly beans to make them taste like “Buttered Popcorn?”
11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting (Slideshow)
The secrets to creating these and other iconic foods are revealed in factory tours around the world, where you can watch your favorite treat made first-hand and can sometimes make it yourself. You may even get to taste a sample or two.
At the Chocolaterie Duval factory in Belgium, visitors get a hands-on tutorial in making the chocolate company’s famous caraques and pralines, from tempering and molding it to designing, packaging, and eventually eating it.
In Japan, recreating the invention of the world’s first instant ramen, the Instant Ramen museum educates guests on how the classic Asian noodle is made and lets them make their own.
Nowhere else can you find as many classic, unusual, and novelty jelly bean flavors than at the Jelly Belly factory in Fairfield, Calif., where the factory air smells like whatever jelly bean flavors are being made that day… maybe cinnamon, buttered popcorn, or strawberry jam.
Read on for more world famous food factories that are worth the trip across the world.

Ben & Jerry’s — U.S.A

Ice cream connoisseurs curious about how their favorite ice cream flavors like “Chunky Monkey” or “Cherry Garcia” are made can watch the flavor magic happen in a guided tour at the Ben & Jerry’s factory in Vermont. Visitors are given an ice cream sample of the day and can try more flavors at the factory’s scoop shop. The Flavor Graveyard is just up the hill from the factory and is available for paying respects to retired Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavors.
Cadbury — United Kingdom

Chocolate “comes to life” at Cadbury World, where chocolate lovers can hop into a “Beanmobile” and explore the history of chocolate, how it’s made, wrapped, and packaged at the Cadbury factory, and more. The park is home to the “World’s Biggest Cadbury Shop,” where guests will find all of their favorite Cadbury chocolates as well as novelty treats not sold at any other chocolate shop.
Click here for more World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting
Haley WIllard is The Daily Meal’s assistant editor. Follow her on Twitter @haleywillrd.  http://ift.tt/1j9GUiB11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting

Ever wonder how Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor “Chunky Monkey” is made to be the ideal blend of chunky and creamy? Or what flavorings are added to Jelly Belly jelly beans to make them taste like “Buttered Popcorn?”

11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting (Slideshow)

The secrets to creating these and other iconic foods are revealed in factory tours around the world, where you can watch your favorite treat made first-hand and can sometimes make it yourself. You may even get to taste a sample or two.

At the Chocolaterie Duval factory in Belgium, visitors get a hands-on tutorial in making the chocolate company’s famous caraques and pralines, from tempering and molding it to designing, packaging, and eventually eating it.

In Japan, recreating the invention of the world’s first instant ramen, the Instant Ramen museum educates guests on how the classic Asian noodle is made and lets them make their own.

Nowhere else can you find as many classic, unusual, and novelty jelly bean flavors than at the Jelly Belly factory in Fairfield, Calif., where the factory air smells like whatever jelly bean flavors are being made that day… maybe cinnamon, buttered popcorn, or strawberry jam.

Read on for more world famous food factories that are worth the trip across the world.

Ben & Jerry’s — U.S.A

Ice cream connoisseurs curious about how their favorite ice cream flavors like “Chunky Monkey” or “Cherry Garcia” are made can watch the flavor magic happen in a guided tour at the Ben & Jerry’s factory in Vermont. Visitors are given an ice cream sample of the day and can try more flavors at the factory’s scoop shop. The Flavor Graveyard is just up the hill from the factory and is available for paying respects to retired Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavors.

Cadbury — United Kingdom

Chocolate “comes to life” at Cadbury World, where chocolate lovers can hop into a “Beanmobile” and explore the history of chocolate, how it’s made, wrapped, and packaged at the Cadbury factory, and more. The park is home to the “World’s Biggest Cadbury Shop,” where guests will find all of their favorite Cadbury chocolates as well as novelty treats not sold at any other chocolate shop.

Click here for more World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting

Haley WIllard is The Daily Meal’s assistant editor. Follow her on Twitter @haleywillrd.

http://ift.tt/1j9GUiB

Apr 16

You Won’t Believe What People Put on Pizza Around the World  There’s so much more to pizza than cheese — people will really put anything from pineapple, to mashed potatoes, to macaroni and cheese (no, really) on a pizza. Visitors to the Minnesota State Fair have even admitted to indulging in a deep-fried corn-dog pizza! Surprisingly, these choice toppings are still fairly palatable in comparison to some.
Click here to see what People Put on Pizza Around the World (Slideshow)
Pizza may have originated in Italy but these days it’s a truly global dish, arguably one of the world’s favorite foods, popular from Korea, to Brazil and everywhere in between. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently noted that about one in eight Americans consumes pizza on any given day, and mostly as dinner.
It’s reasonable then, that people will try to combine it with some of their other favorite foods like spare ribs, perhaps, or even hamburger meat (or in some cases the whole hamburger). Then there are some combinations like the baked beans pizza from the U.K. that push the envelope out a little further.
Also in the U.K., you’ll find an array of chocolate pizza offerings. Some are actually pizzas made from gourmet chocolates, and others throw chocolate chips and cream cheese on a pizza crust… an interesting choice either way.
Back in the U.S.,  Missouri locals take advantage of cicada season by baking up the bugs into a cheesy pizza masterpiece. Incidentally, they also (briefly) make a popular cicada ice-cream, which Missouri conservation officials are none too keen on.
What strange toppings would you put on your pizza? Prawns? Crocodile? Kangaroo? Read on to see what unusual toppings people are putting on their pizzas around the world.
Crocodile — Sydney, Australia

Crocodile pizza and crocodile bread are quite popular in Australia… in fact, as an abundant local meat, crocodile is often consumed in various dishes. If you fancy, there are also kangaroo and emu pizza toppings on offer at select eateries around the country. No word on Crocodile Dundee’s involvement in this creation! 
Cicada Pizza — Missouri, U.S.A

Cicadas may only surface once every 17 years, but when they do they’re (apparently) fair game for pizza lovers. One Missouri pizzeria decided to add the buzzing insects to a pizza, and it was so popular it sold out in in couple of days.
Read on for more about What People Put on Pizza Around the World  http://ift.tt/1l3JqwqYou Won’t Believe What People Put on Pizza Around the World

There’s so much more to pizza than cheese — people will really put anything from pineapple, to mashed potatoes, to macaroni and cheese (no, really) on a pizza. Visitors to the Minnesota State Fair have even admitted to indulging in a deep-fried corn-dog pizza! Surprisingly, these choice toppings are still fairly palatable in comparison to some.

Click here to see what People Put on Pizza Around the World (Slideshow)

Pizza may have originated in Italy but these days it’s a truly global dish, arguably one of the world’s favorite foods, popular from Korea, to Brazil and everywhere in between. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently noted that about one in eight Americans consumes pizza on any given day, and mostly as dinner.

It’s reasonable then, that people will try to combine it with some of their other favorite foods like spare ribs, perhaps, or even hamburger meat (or in some cases the whole hamburger). Then there are some combinations like the baked beans pizza from the U.K. that push the envelope out a little further.

Also in the U.K., you’ll find an array of chocolate pizza offerings. Some are actually pizzas made from gourmet chocolates, and others throw chocolate chips and cream cheese on a pizza crust… an interesting choice either way.

Back in the U.S.,  Missouri locals take advantage of cicada season by baking up the bugs into a cheesy pizza masterpiece. Incidentally, they also (briefly) make a popular cicada ice-cream, which Missouri conservation officials are none too keen on.

What strange toppings would you put on your pizza? Prawns? Crocodile? Kangaroo? Read on to see what unusual toppings people are putting on their pizzas around the world.

Crocodile — Sydney, Australia

Crocodile pizza and crocodile bread are quite popular in Australia… in fact, as an abundant local meat, crocodile is often consumed in various dishes. If you fancy, there are also kangaroo and emu pizza toppings on offer at select eateries around the country. No word on Crocodile Dundee’s involvement in this creation! 

Cicada Pizza — Missouri, U.S.A

Cicadas may only surface once every 17 years, but when they do they’re (apparently) fair game for pizza lovers. One Missouri pizzeria decided to add the buzzing insects to a pizza, and it was so popular it sold out in in couple of days.

Read on for more about What People Put on Pizza Around the World

http://ift.tt/1l3Jqwq

Punta Mita Gourmet & Golf Classic: A Culinary Hole in One  There’s a private peninsula jutting out from the Mexican mainland about 26 miles north of Puerto Vallarta in the Mexican state of Nayarit. It’s called Punta Mita, which translates to “point of the arrow” in the area’s native language, and once you’ve passed through the actual gates of one of the two resorts that occupy much of the peninsula — the St. Regis and the Four Seasons, where I stayed from April 3rd through the 6th during their annual American Express Punta Mita Gourmet and Golf Classic — you’ll truly feel like you’ve stepped into a different world, one you’ll find yourself repeatedly referring to as Paradise.
Punta Mita Gourmet & Golf Classic: A Culinary Hole in One (Slideshow)
Located on 1,500 acres of land, the 173-room Four Seasons is a sprawling complex of 135 semi-private casitas, 34 suites, and 4 villas. The lobby is located inside a giant palapa, with views of the Pacific Ocean beyond. Many of the rooms face directly out onto the ocean, with the only thing between you and the water being a small cliff, perhaps a hammock, and maybe a couple seabirds. The grounds are maintained by a huge crew (the staff-to-guest ratio is about 8:1), but if you’d rather not walk through them to get from your room to the lobby, gym, spa, lazy river, or any of the other amenities, you can call for a golf cart to take you there. 
“Our guests really feel at home here,” Aurora Castaneda, the resort’s public relations manager, told me. “Our people are really committed to being friends with the guests, always thinking how they can make them feel special. It comes from the heart; a lot of people who stay here say that it’s the best Four Seasons because of the people.”
Culinary options at the Four Seasons include four restaurants: Open-air Ketsi is located under a huge palapa, is open all day long, and serves Mexican classics; Bahia by Richard Sandoval is a seafood-oriented grille serving dinner, located right on the beach; Aramara serves Asian fare like sushi and sashimi but with a Latin twist; and Nuna Bar, on a patio overlooking the ocean, specializes in ceviche. 

The St. Regis is a five minute drive away, and is also stunningly beautiful. The 120-room resort boasts four restaurants: the Mita Mary (above), a boat on the beach that’s been outfitted with a grill, serving freshly-caught seafood; the Sea Breeze, an international restaurant with a pizza oven; Carolina, an upscale AAA 5-Diamond restaurant preparing Mexican fare using French techniques; and Marietta’s, a traditional Mexican restaurant serving breakfast and lunch.
Hundreds of golfers descended on the peninsula for the festival, as both resorts co-hosted the fourth annual American Express Gourmet and Golf Classic. The two Jack Nicklaus-designed golf courses on the property are among the finest in the country, and include the world’s only natural offshore green. They’re also quite exclusive: you need to be staying on the property in order to golf there.
While golf was the main draw, the “gourmet” aspect of it wasn’t given short shrift in the least. Walk-around tasting events featuring chefs from the resorts’ restaurants were held almost nightly, with a host of specially-arranged lunches, dinners, wine and mescal tastings, and cooking classes to keep the guests not there for the golf entertained.
Read on to check out some of the best bites from the festival, as well as some shots of the beautiful peninsula. 
View from Above
	Flying into Puerto Vallarta, you can see just how remote the peninsula is thanks to a birds-eye view.
Opening Night
	The Aeroméxico and Delta Opening Cocktail was held at the St. Regis, where guests had the opportunity to sample offerings from chefs participating in the festival.
Click here to see more photos from the Punta Mita Gourmet and Golf Classic.  http://ift.tt/1l8wh0HPunta Mita Gourmet & Golf Classic: A Culinary Hole in One

There’s a private peninsula jutting out from the Mexican mainland about 26 miles north of Puerto Vallarta in the Mexican state of Nayarit. It’s called Punta Mita, which translates to “point of the arrow” in the area’s native language, and once you’ve passed through the actual gates of one of the two resorts that occupy much of the peninsula — the St. Regis and the Four Seasons, where I stayed from April 3rd through the 6th during their annual American Express Punta Mita Gourmet and Golf Classic  you’ll truly feel like you’ve stepped into a different world, one you’ll find yourself repeatedly referring to as Paradise.

Punta Mita Gourmet & Golf Classic: A Culinary Hole in One (Slideshow)

Located on 1,500 acres of land, the 173-room Four Seasons is a sprawling complex of 135 semi-private casitas, 34 suites, and 4 villas. The lobby is located inside a giant palapa, with views of the Pacific Ocean beyond. Many of the rooms face directly out onto the ocean, with the only thing between you and the water being a small cliff, perhaps a hammock, and maybe a couple seabirds. The grounds are maintained by a huge crew (the staff-to-guest ratio is about 8:1), but if you’d rather not walk through them to get from your room to the lobby, gym, spa, lazy river, or any of the other amenities, you can call for a golf cart to take you there.

“Our guests really feel at home here,” Aurora Castaneda, the resort’s public relations manager, told me. “Our people are really committed to being friends with the guests, always thinking how they can make them feel special. It comes from the heart; a lot of people who stay here say that it’s the best Four Seasons because of the people.”

Culinary options at the Four Seasons include four restaurants: Open-air Ketsi is located under a huge palapa, is open all day long, and serves Mexican classics; Bahia by Richard Sandoval is a seafood-oriented grille serving dinner, located right on the beach; Aramara serves Asian fare like sushi and sashimi but with a Latin twist; and Nuna Bar, on a patio overlooking the ocean, specializes in ceviche. 

The St. Regis is a five minute drive away, and is also stunningly beautiful. The 120-room resort boasts four restaurants: the Mita Mary (above), a boat on the beach that’s been outfitted with a grill, serving freshly-caught seafood; the Sea Breeze, an international restaurant with a pizza oven; Carolina, an upscale AAA 5-Diamond restaurant preparing Mexican fare using French techniques; and Marietta’s, a traditional Mexican restaurant serving breakfast and lunch.

Hundreds of golfers descended on the peninsula for the festival, as both resorts co-hosted the fourth annual American Express Gourmet and Golf Classic. The two Jack Nicklaus-designed golf courses on the property are among the finest in the country, and include the world’s only natural offshore green. They’re also quite exclusive: you need to be staying on the property in order to golf there.

While golf was the main draw, the “gourmet” aspect of it wasn’t given short shrift in the least. Walk-around tasting events featuring chefs from the resorts’ restaurants were held almost nightly, with a host of specially-arranged lunches, dinners, wine and mescal tastings, and cooking classes to keep the guests not there for the golf entertained.

Read on to check out some of the best bites from the festival, as well as some shots of the beautiful peninsula. 

View from Above

Flying into Puerto Vallarta, you can see just how remote the peninsula is thanks to a birds-eye view.

Opening Night

The Aeroméxico and Delta Opening Cocktail was held at the St. Regis, where guests had the opportunity to sample offerings from chefs participating in the festival.

Click here to see more photos from the Punta Mita Gourmet and Golf Classic.

http://ift.tt/1l8wh0H

Apr 11

9 Countries That Eat Cats and Dogs  In downtown Shanghai a provocative campaign is making the rounds, encouraging people to stop eating cats and dogs. Though frowned upon by most western culture, the practice is actually quite common in China and much of Asia.
Click here to see the 9 Countries That Eat Cats and Dogs (Slideshow)
While the Chinese government is thinking of outright banning the eating of cats and dogs, the custom is so widespread and popular that animal rights groups believe the best approach may be to the public’s morals instead: “What You Just Put In Your Mouth Could Have Been Your Child’s Partner in Growth,” accuses one advert displayed at train station.
Eating your beloved pet poodle or fluffy Siamese cat may seem like an offensive and incredibly taboo concept throughout most of the world, but cats and dogs haven’t always been considered pets. In many parts of the world, like Mexico and Polynesia, their existence predated the arrival of European settlers and they were commonly bred for food.
Even now, cats and dogs are commonplace on many menus in Vietnam, Korea, and China. They’re eaten as solo meals or added to other meat dishes for a touch of extra flavor. In some cases the meat or lard is even used for medicinal purposes.
The argument could be made that dogs and cats may actually be the only source of meat for a population, and despite cultural taboos, is possibly the best source of nutrients for survival. In war-torn Syria, for example, the thousands of starving Syrian refugees are encouraged to eat stray cats and dogs (though there not yet reports on how often this happens).
It’s not confined to war zones either. In many cities across the world there’ve been numerous reports of stray cats and dogs being consumed by the homeless and poor during particularly rough times. Simply put, when there’s no other food available, eating a cat or dog (regardless of your own feelings on the matter) may be the only way to stay alive.
Truth is, the practice of eating cats and dogs is more common than you think, and may even be happening right under your nose. Read on to see where they’re eating cats and dogs around the world.
Taiwan

Eating cats and dogs is not only extremely popular in Taiwan but there is a prolific underground trade supplying strays to local restaurants and meat vendors across the country. The meat is usually added to other, more parochial meat dishes for added flavor. For the record, the government has passed legislation banning the practice, but it still persists and is very popular particularly in smaller towns and villages.
Hawaii

Yes, even in some parts of the U.S. you’ll find people that are completely okay with eating puppies. There’ve been reports aplenty across the Aloha state about people eating stray cats and dogs for years. There’re also plenty of pets that are kidnapped for human consumption too. An eight-year-old Labrador named Caddy was recently dog-napped from an equipment shack at a golf course (where his owner left him while he was teeing-off) by local landscape workers who butchered and ate him.
Hawaii’s house committee recently tried to pass a bill banning the eating of cats and on the island, but it was shelved because there was too little concrete, legislative evidence for it (meaning that while it does happen a lot, not everyone goes to jail for it so there aren’t formal records). It takes the American “hot dog” to a whole new level, no?
Read on for more about the 9 Countries That Eat Cats and Dogs
Serusha Govender is The Daily Meal’s Travel Editor. Follow her on Twitter @SerushaGovender  http://ift.tt/1qJREaf9 Countries That Eat Cats and Dogs

In downtown Shanghai a provocative campaign is making the rounds, encouraging people to stop eating cats and dogs. Though frowned upon by most western culture, the practice is actually quite common in China and much of Asia.

Click here to see the 9 Countries That Eat Cats and Dogs (Slideshow)

While the Chinese government is thinking of outright banning the eating of cats and dogs, the custom is so widespread and popular that animal rights groups believe the best approach may be to the public’s morals instead: “What You Just Put In Your Mouth Could Have Been Your Child’s Partner in Growth,” accuses one advert displayed at train station.

Eating your beloved pet poodle or fluffy Siamese cat may seem like an offensive and incredibly taboo concept throughout most of the world, but cats and dogs haven’t always been considered pets. In many parts of the world, like Mexico and Polynesia, their existence predated the arrival of European settlers and they were commonly bred for food.

Even now, cats and dogs are commonplace on many menus in Vietnam, Korea, and China. They’re eaten as solo meals or added to other meat dishes for a touch of extra flavor. In some cases the meat or lard is even used for medicinal purposes.

The argument could be made that dogs and cats may actually be the only source of meat for a population, and despite cultural taboos, is possibly the best source of nutrients for survival. In war-torn Syria, for example, the thousands of starving Syrian refugees are encouraged to eat stray cats and dogs (though there not yet reports on how often this happens).

It’s not confined to war zones either. In many cities across the world there’ve been numerous reports of stray cats and dogs being consumed by the homeless and poor during particularly rough times. Simply put, when there’s no other food available, eating a cat or dog (regardless of your own feelings on the matter) may be the only way to stay alive.

Truth is, the practice of eating cats and dogs is more common than you think, and may even be happening right under your nose. Read on to see where they’re eating cats and dogs around the world.

Taiwan

Eating cats and dogs is not only extremely popular in Taiwan but there is a prolific underground trade supplying strays to local restaurants and meat vendors across the country. The meat is usually added to other, more parochial meat dishes for added flavor. For the record, the government has passed legislation banning the practice, but it still persists and is very popular particularly in smaller towns and villages.

Hawaii

Yes, even in some parts of the U.S. you’ll find people that are completely okay with eating puppies. There’ve been reports aplenty across the Aloha state about people eating stray cats and dogs for years. There’re also plenty of pets that are kidnapped for human consumption too. An eight-year-old Labrador named Caddy was recently dog-napped from an equipment shack at a golf course (where his owner left him while he was teeing-off) by local landscape workers who butchered and ate him.

Hawaii’s house committee recently tried to pass a bill banning the eating of cats and on the island, but it was shelved because there was too little concrete, legislative evidence for it (meaning that while it does happen a lot, not everyone goes to jail for it so there aren’t formal records). It takes the American “hot dog” to a whole new level, no?

Read on for more about the 9 Countries That Eat Cats and Dogs

Serusha Govender is The Daily Meal’s Travel Editor. Follow her on Twitter @SerushaGovender

http://ift.tt/1qJREaf

14 Ways People Make Mac and Cheese Around the World http://ift.tt/1iCcHal

14 Ways People Make Mac and Cheese Around the World http://ift.tt/1iCcHal

Apr 10

6 American Meat Products That Are Banned Abroad http://ift.tt/1sI3jdz

6 American Meat Products That Are Banned Abroad http://ift.tt/1sI3jdz