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Wedding Banquet Meals Around the World  Weddings are a time of great celebration throughout the world, but it’s often the banquet food that really gets people in the party mood — we’re talking about the snacks and hors d’oeuvres, what the bride and groom choose to serve as the main course and, of course, that wedding cake!
Food has a very important role to play at these events and it also plays an important part in how people will remember the special day. No matter where you are in the world there are banquet food traditions that are often worked into the ceremony or reception that give the occasion gravitas and added meaning.
Click here to see some more Wedding Banquest Around the World (Slideshow)
Some of these traditions are very old, dating back hundreds of years and are closely tied to the culture and history of a country and its people. Other traditions also have strong ties to the seasons or the food local to the area. No matter what, they are loaded with symbolism for the new couple.
Each culture across the world has its own special wedding banquet foods they prefer. In Greece and much of the Mediterranean region, there is much emphasis placed on the ceremony of breaking bread, which is usually done with a chunk of a sourdough loaf that is broken above the couples heads to symbolize their strength in overcoming life’s problems together. In Sweden, most brides request a “princess cake” to be served at their wedding — based on one made for the royal sister before the birth of Carl XVI Gustaf, the reigning king of Sweden. The cake is decadent and marzipan sweet, with layers of raspberries and cream.
In Zimbabwe, weddings are a community affair. Back in times when there was little meat available, weddings were an occasion for the whole village to come over and share one hearty and meaty meal. These days the tradition continues with guest being served a meat stew with local dishes to accompany it.
Read on to find out more about how people around the world celebrate their weddings with marvelous meals and banquet traditions.
Greece

In this centuries old tradition, the mother of the bride or groom breaks a loaf of sourdough bread above the couple’s heads (usually at the entrance of their home before they enter as the receptions are often held there). It represents the newlyweds ability to weather any of life’s challenges and build a strong home and family as equals. The saying “to break bread,” is believed to have come from this Greek wedding tradition.
Mexico

Goat meat is popular in Mexican cooking and there are many legends and traditions involving goats and goat meat in Mexican culture and history. For weddings, a goat meat dish called birria is purported to have magical aphrodisiac qualities — it’s served to bride and groom to help them along in building a large family. Sometimes lamb, pork, or beef is used instead of goat, but the meat is always cooked traditionally: In a hole in the ground filled with hot rocks, coals, and a clay pot (which is lined with maguey leaves and the meat). It’s then left to roast for several hours on the wedding day.
	Read on for more Wedding Banquets Around the World  http://ift.tt/1rbUR2z
Wedding Banquet Meals Around the World  Weddings are a time of great celebration throughout the world, but it’s often the banquet food that really gets people in the party mood — we’re talking about the snacks and hors d’oeuvres, what the bride and groom choose to serve as the main course and, of course, that wedding cake!
Food has a very important role to play at these events and it also plays an important part in how people will remember the special day. No matter where you are in the world there are banquet food traditions that are often worked into the ceremony or reception that give the occasion gravitas and added meaning.
Click here to see some more Wedding Banquest Around the World (Slideshow)
Some of these traditions are very old, dating back hundreds of years and are closely tied to the culture and history of a country and its people. Other traditions also have strong ties to the seasons or the food local to the area. No matter what, they are loaded with symbolism for the new couple.
Each culture across the world has its own special wedding banquet foods they prefer. In Greece and much of the Mediterranean region, there is much emphasis placed on the ceremony of breaking bread, which is usually done with a chunk of a sourdough loaf that is broken above the couples heads to symbolize their strength in overcoming life’s problems together. In Sweden, most brides request a “princess cake” to be served at their wedding — based on one made for the royal sister before the birth of Carl XVI Gustaf, the reigning king of Sweden. The cake is decadent and marzipan sweet, with layers of raspberries and cream.
In Zimbabwe, weddings are a community affair. Back in times when there was little meat available, weddings were an occasion for the whole village to come over and share one hearty and meaty meal. These days the tradition continues with guest being served a meat stew with local dishes to accompany it.
Read on to find out more about how people around the world celebrate their weddings with marvelous meals and banquet traditions.
Greece

In this centuries old tradition, the mother of the bride or groom breaks a loaf of sourdough bread above the couple’s heads (usually at the entrance of their home before they enter as the receptions are often held there). It represents the newlyweds ability to weather any of life’s challenges and build a strong home and family as equals. The saying “to break bread,” is believed to have come from this Greek wedding tradition.
Mexico

Goat meat is popular in Mexican cooking and there are many legends and traditions involving goats and goat meat in Mexican culture and history. For weddings, a goat meat dish called birria is purported to have magical aphrodisiac qualities — it’s served to bride and groom to help them along in building a large family. Sometimes lamb, pork, or beef is used instead of goat, but the meat is always cooked traditionally: In a hole in the ground filled with hot rocks, coals, and a clay pot (which is lined with maguey leaves and the meat). It’s then left to roast for several hours on the wedding day.
	Read on for more Wedding Banquets Around the World  http://ift.tt/1rbUR2z
The 14 Things You Need to Eat at Yankee Stadium This Season  The Yankees and Mets rivalry is a classic city-wide battle, and since 2009, Yankee Stadium and Citi Field have been conjuring up stadium beef (no pun intended). Citi Field has been nationally known as one of the best ballparks for food with Shake Shack and Blue Smoke. Yankee Stadium brought in Parm and Lobel’s, but Citi Field was still thought of as superior.
The 14 Things You Need to Eat at Yankee Stadium This Season (Slideshow)
This season, they’ve brought in a host of new items for fans. Chicken and waffles, tacos and empanadas, frozen yogurt, and the incredible nacho helmet are just a few examples. They’ve also brought in Papa John’s pizza this year, a frozen yogurt stand, and an unlimited popcorn bucket for $12. 
“As always, and even with all of the new items that we have added, Hebrew National and Nathan’s hot dogs were the number one selling items on Opening Day,” Chris Buffa, general manager for concessions at Yankee Stadium says. “Chicken and waffles, waffles and ice cream and the souvenir batting helmet nachos were a big hit with the fans.”
They’re making everything fresh and in-house, including the tortillas and sauces for tacos, and three different types of aioli for the fresh cut and ribbon fries. ”We are always trying to push the culinary envelope, making sure that we align ourselves with current culinary trends and our guests’ expectations,” said Yankee Stadium Executive Chef, Matt Gibson. “For us, it is important to make sure that everyone who walks through the gates of Yankee Stadium has a memorable food experience.” So if rookie infielder Yangervis Solarte’s hot streak isn’t enough to get you to a game, perhaps all this will be.
Bacon Cheddar Stuffed Burger

This burger is sold at the Malibu Rooftop Deck, on the 300 level in right field.
Malibu Dreamsicle

Also available at the Malibu Rooftop Deck is the Malibu Dreamsicle, made with Malibu Orange Float Rum, Pinnacle Whipped Vodka, fresh orange juice, and club soda.
Click here for more of the 14 things you need to eat at Yankee Stadium this season.
Jane Bruce is the Photo Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @janeebruce.  http://ift.tt/1qUTHdz
The 14 Things You Need to Eat at Yankee Stadium This Season  The Yankees and Mets rivalry is a classic city-wide battle, and since 2009, Yankee Stadium and Citi Field have been conjuring up stadium beef (no pun intended). Citi Field has been nationally known as one of the best ballparks for food with Shake Shack and Blue Smoke. Yankee Stadium brought in Parm and Lobel’s, but Citi Field was still thought of as superior.
The 14 Things You Need to Eat at Yankee Stadium This Season (Slideshow)
This season, they’ve brought in a host of new items for fans. Chicken and waffles, tacos and empanadas, frozen yogurt, and the incredible nacho helmet are just a few examples. They’ve also brought in Papa John’s pizza this year, a frozen yogurt stand, and an unlimited popcorn bucket for $12. 
“As always, and even with all of the new items that we have added, Hebrew National and Nathan’s hot dogs were the number one selling items on Opening Day,” Chris Buffa, general manager for concessions at Yankee Stadium says. “Chicken and waffles, waffles and ice cream and the souvenir batting helmet nachos were a big hit with the fans.”
They’re making everything fresh and in-house, including the tortillas and sauces for tacos, and three different types of aioli for the fresh cut and ribbon fries. ”We are always trying to push the culinary envelope, making sure that we align ourselves with current culinary trends and our guests’ expectations,” said Yankee Stadium Executive Chef, Matt Gibson. “For us, it is important to make sure that everyone who walks through the gates of Yankee Stadium has a memorable food experience.” So if rookie infielder Yangervis Solarte’s hot streak isn’t enough to get you to a game, perhaps all this will be.
Bacon Cheddar Stuffed Burger

This burger is sold at the Malibu Rooftop Deck, on the 300 level in right field.
Malibu Dreamsicle

Also available at the Malibu Rooftop Deck is the Malibu Dreamsicle, made with Malibu Orange Float Rum, Pinnacle Whipped Vodka, fresh orange juice, and club soda.
Click here for more of the 14 things you need to eat at Yankee Stadium this season.
Jane Bruce is the Photo Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @janeebruce.  http://ift.tt/1qUTHdz
10 Outrageously Expensive Dishes Around the World  Most people don’t mind paying a little extra for a really good steak, especially if it’s made from delicious Kobe beef. Sometimes you may even be willing to fork out a little extra cash for a gourmet lobster dinner… but would you still do it if that lobster came with flakes of edible gold leaf and set you back more than a thousand dollars?
Click here to see 10 Outrageously Expensive Desserts Around the World (Slideshow)
Around the world, chefs are challenging themselves to create some decadently expensive meals. From an absurdly expensive bagel at the Westin Hotel in New York City (made with white truffle and gold leaves), to an omelette made with a whole lobster that’ll cost around $1000 (also in New York City, incidentally), to an English soup made with shark’s fin which all costs just under $200 — people are whipping up dishes with rare and expensive ingredients and charging an arm and a leg for them.
What’s perhaps even more outrageous is that their fancy clientele is more than willing to pay for it. Some of these dishes need to be ordered in advance and have a weeks-long waiting list for them. Others are not big sellers: like Arnaud’s Strawberries in New Orleans, which comes with a diamond ring and is generally reserved for really over-the-top proposals (though at a price point of over $3 million, selling just one of these dishes every few months should be more than enough to cover your rent bill).
Think that’s excessive? Read on to learn more about some of the world’s most outrageously expensive dishes.
Chocolate Pudding — Lindeth Howe Country House Hotel, England

Who doesn’t love a good chocolate pudding? from the guests at the Lindeth Howe Country Hotel better if they plan on ordering one. This one is made with the best quality chocolate on the planet which is molded into the shape of Fabergé egg and served with layer upon layer of champagne jelly. It’s then topped with edible gold leaf and served with champagne and caviar. The whole thing is then topped off with a diamond. Don’t think you can order this à la carte though… you’ll need to pre-order this dessert at least two weeks in advance.
Price: $35,000
Westin Hotel Bagel —New York City

What’s your favorite bagel topping? Cream cheese? Lox? Perhaps if you feel like splurging a bit, you’ll opt for some smoked salmon or even caviar? One New York chef decided to push the bagel envelope by adding white truffle cream cheese, goji berry-infused Riesling jelly, and topped with gold leaves making it the world’s most expensive bagel (mostly because white truffles are the second most expensive food on the planet). It was designed to help raise funds for Les Amis d’Escoffier Scholarship, which raises funds for needy students of the culinary arts.
Price: $1000
Read on for more about the most Outrageously Expensive Desserts Around the World  http://ift.tt/1j9K1Ww
10 Outrageously Expensive Dishes Around the World  Most people don’t mind paying a little extra for a really good steak, especially if it’s made from delicious Kobe beef. Sometimes you may even be willing to fork out a little extra cash for a gourmet lobster dinner… but would you still do it if that lobster came with flakes of edible gold leaf and set you back more than a thousand dollars?
Click here to see 10 Outrageously Expensive Desserts Around the World (Slideshow)
Around the world, chefs are challenging themselves to create some decadently expensive meals. From an absurdly expensive bagel at the Westin Hotel in New York City (made with white truffle and gold leaves), to an omelette made with a whole lobster that’ll cost around $1000 (also in New York City, incidentally), to an English soup made with shark’s fin which all costs just under $200 — people are whipping up dishes with rare and expensive ingredients and charging an arm and a leg for them.
What’s perhaps even more outrageous is that their fancy clientele is more than willing to pay for it. Some of these dishes need to be ordered in advance and have a weeks-long waiting list for them. Others are not big sellers: like Arnaud’s Strawberries in New Orleans, which comes with a diamond ring and is generally reserved for really over-the-top proposals (though at a price point of over $3 million, selling just one of these dishes every few months should be more than enough to cover your rent bill).
Think that’s excessive? Read on to learn more about some of the world’s most outrageously expensive dishes.
Chocolate Pudding — Lindeth Howe Country House Hotel, England

Who doesn’t love a good chocolate pudding? from the guests at the Lindeth Howe Country Hotel better if they plan on ordering one. This one is made with the best quality chocolate on the planet which is molded into the shape of Fabergé egg and served with layer upon layer of champagne jelly. It’s then topped with edible gold leaf and served with champagne and caviar. The whole thing is then topped off with a diamond. Don’t think you can order this à la carte though… you’ll need to pre-order this dessert at least two weeks in advance.
Price: $35,000
Westin Hotel Bagel —New York City

What’s your favorite bagel topping? Cream cheese? Lox? Perhaps if you feel like splurging a bit, you’ll opt for some smoked salmon or even caviar? One New York chef decided to push the bagel envelope by adding white truffle cream cheese, goji berry-infused Riesling jelly, and topped with gold leaves making it the world’s most expensive bagel (mostly because white truffles are the second most expensive food on the planet). It was designed to help raise funds for Les Amis d’Escoffier Scholarship, which raises funds for needy students of the culinary arts.
Price: $1000
Read on for more about the most Outrageously Expensive Desserts Around the World  http://ift.tt/1j9K1Ww
11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting  Ever wonder how Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor “Chunky Monkey” is made to be the ideal blend of chunky and creamy? Or what flavorings are added to Jelly Belly jelly beans to make them taste like “Buttered Popcorn?”
11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting (Slideshow)
The secrets to creating these and other iconic foods are revealed in factory tours around the world, where you can watch your favorite treat made first-hand and can sometimes make it yourself. You may even get to taste a sample or two.
At the Chocolaterie Duval factory in Belgium, visitors get a hands-on tutorial in making the chocolate company’s famous caraques and pralines, from tempering and molding it to designing, packaging, and eventually eating it.
In Japan, recreating the invention of the world’s first instant ramen, the Instant Ramen museum educates guests on how the classic Asian noodle is made and lets them make their own.
Nowhere else can you find as many classic, unusual, and novelty jelly bean flavors than at the Jelly Belly factory in Fairfield, Calif., where the factory air smells like whatever jelly bean flavors are being made that day… maybe cinnamon, buttered popcorn, or strawberry jam.
Read on for more world famous food factories that are worth the trip across the world.

Ben & Jerry’s — U.S.A

Ice cream connoisseurs curious about how their favorite ice cream flavors like “Chunky Monkey” or “Cherry Garcia” are made can watch the flavor magic happen in a guided tour at the Ben & Jerry’s factory in Vermont. Visitors are given an ice cream sample of the day and can try more flavors at the factory’s scoop shop. The Flavor Graveyard is just up the hill from the factory and is available for paying respects to retired Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavors.
Cadbury — United Kingdom

Chocolate “comes to life” at Cadbury World, where chocolate lovers can hop into a “Beanmobile” and explore the history of chocolate, how it’s made, wrapped, and packaged at the Cadbury factory, and more. The park is home to the “World’s Biggest Cadbury Shop,” where guests will find all of their favorite Cadbury chocolates as well as novelty treats not sold at any other chocolate shop.
Click here for more World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting
Haley WIllard is The Daily Meal’s assistant editor. Follow her on Twitter @haleywillrd.  http://ift.tt/1j9GUiB
11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting  Ever wonder how Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor “Chunky Monkey” is made to be the ideal blend of chunky and creamy? Or what flavorings are added to Jelly Belly jelly beans to make them taste like “Buttered Popcorn?”
11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting (Slideshow)
The secrets to creating these and other iconic foods are revealed in factory tours around the world, where you can watch your favorite treat made first-hand and can sometimes make it yourself. You may even get to taste a sample or two.
At the Chocolaterie Duval factory in Belgium, visitors get a hands-on tutorial in making the chocolate company’s famous caraques and pralines, from tempering and molding it to designing, packaging, and eventually eating it.
In Japan, recreating the invention of the world’s first instant ramen, the Instant Ramen museum educates guests on how the classic Asian noodle is made and lets them make their own.
Nowhere else can you find as many classic, unusual, and novelty jelly bean flavors than at the Jelly Belly factory in Fairfield, Calif., where the factory air smells like whatever jelly bean flavors are being made that day… maybe cinnamon, buttered popcorn, or strawberry jam.
Read on for more world famous food factories that are worth the trip across the world.

Ben & Jerry’s — U.S.A

Ice cream connoisseurs curious about how their favorite ice cream flavors like “Chunky Monkey” or “Cherry Garcia” are made can watch the flavor magic happen in a guided tour at the Ben & Jerry’s factory in Vermont. Visitors are given an ice cream sample of the day and can try more flavors at the factory’s scoop shop. The Flavor Graveyard is just up the hill from the factory and is available for paying respects to retired Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavors.
Cadbury — United Kingdom

Chocolate “comes to life” at Cadbury World, where chocolate lovers can hop into a “Beanmobile” and explore the history of chocolate, how it’s made, wrapped, and packaged at the Cadbury factory, and more. The park is home to the “World’s Biggest Cadbury Shop,” where guests will find all of their favorite Cadbury chocolates as well as novelty treats not sold at any other chocolate shop.
Click here for more World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting
Haley WIllard is The Daily Meal’s assistant editor. Follow her on Twitter @haleywillrd.  http://ift.tt/1j9GUiB
11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting  Ever wonder how Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor “Chunky Monkey” is made to be the ideal blend of chunky and creamy? Or what flavorings are added to Jelly Belly jelly beans to make them taste like “Buttered Popcorn?”
11 World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting (Slideshow)
The secrets to creating these and other iconic foods are revealed in factory tours around the world, where you can watch your favorite treat made first-hand and can sometimes make it yourself. You may even get to taste a sample or two.
At the Chocolaterie Duval factory in Belgium, visitors get a hands-on tutorial in making the chocolate company’s famous caraques and pralines, from tempering and molding it to designing, packaging, and eventually eating it.
In Japan, recreating the invention of the world’s first instant ramen, the Instant Ramen museum educates guests on how the classic Asian noodle is made and lets them make their own.
Nowhere else can you find as many classic, unusual, and novelty jelly bean flavors than at the Jelly Belly factory in Fairfield, Calif., where the factory air smells like whatever jelly bean flavors are being made that day… maybe cinnamon, buttered popcorn, or strawberry jam.
Read on for more world famous food factories that are worth the trip across the world.

Ben & Jerry’s — U.S.A

Ice cream connoisseurs curious about how their favorite ice cream flavors like “Chunky Monkey” or “Cherry Garcia” are made can watch the flavor magic happen in a guided tour at the Ben & Jerry’s factory in Vermont. Visitors are given an ice cream sample of the day and can try more flavors at the factory’s scoop shop. The Flavor Graveyard is just up the hill from the factory and is available for paying respects to retired Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavors.
Cadbury — United Kingdom

Chocolate “comes to life” at Cadbury World, where chocolate lovers can hop into a “Beanmobile” and explore the history of chocolate, how it’s made, wrapped, and packaged at the Cadbury factory, and more. The park is home to the “World’s Biggest Cadbury Shop,” where guests will find all of their favorite Cadbury chocolates as well as novelty treats not sold at any other chocolate shop.
Click here for more World Famous Food Factories Worth Visiting
Haley WIllard is The Daily Meal’s assistant editor. Follow her on Twitter @haleywillrd.  http://ift.tt/1j9GUiB
You Won’t Believe What People Put on Pizza Around the World  There’s so much more to pizza than cheese — people will really put anything from pineapple, to mashed potatoes, to macaroni and cheese (no, really) on a pizza. Visitors to the Minnesota State Fair have even admitted to indulging in a deep-fried corn-dog pizza! Surprisingly, these choice toppings are still fairly palatable in comparison to some.
Click here to see what People Put on Pizza Around the World (Slideshow)
Pizza may have originated in Italy but these days it’s a truly global dish, arguably one of the world’s favorite foods, popular from Korea, to Brazil and everywhere in between. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently noted that about one in eight Americans consumes pizza on any given day, and mostly as dinner.
It’s reasonable then, that people will try to combine it with some of their other favorite foods like spare ribs, perhaps, or even hamburger meat (or in some cases the whole hamburger). Then there are some combinations like the baked beans pizza from the U.K. that push the envelope out a little further.
Also in the U.K., you’ll find an array of chocolate pizza offerings. Some are actually pizzas made from gourmet chocolates, and others throw chocolate chips and cream cheese on a pizza crust… an interesting choice either way.
Back in the U.S.,  Missouri locals take advantage of cicada season by baking up the bugs into a cheesy pizza masterpiece. Incidentally, they also (briefly) make a popular cicada ice-cream, which Missouri conservation officials are none too keen on.
What strange toppings would you put on your pizza? Prawns? Crocodile? Kangaroo? Read on to see what unusual toppings people are putting on their pizzas around the world.
Crocodile — Sydney, Australia

Crocodile pizza and crocodile bread are quite popular in Australia… in fact, as an abundant local meat, crocodile is often consumed in various dishes. If you fancy, there are also kangaroo and emu pizza toppings on offer at select eateries around the country. No word on Crocodile Dundee’s involvement in this creation! 
Cicada Pizza — Missouri, U.S.A

Cicadas may only surface once every 17 years, but when they do they’re (apparently) fair game for pizza lovers. One Missouri pizzeria decided to add the buzzing insects to a pizza, and it was so popular it sold out in in couple of days.
Read on for more about What People Put on Pizza Around the World  http://ift.tt/1l3Jqwq